• English
    X

    Google Translate Disclaimer

    The Maryland Department of Information Technology (“DoIT”) offers translations of the content through Google Translate. Because Google Translate is an external website, DoIT does not control the quality or accuracy of translated content. All DoIT content is filtered through Google Translate which may result in unexpected and unpredictable degradation of portions of text, images and the general appearance on translated pages. Google Translate may maintain unique privacy and use policies. These policies are not controlled by DoIT and are not associated with DoIT’s privacy and use policies. After selecting a translation option, users will be notified that they are leaving DoIT’s website. Users should consult the original English content on DoIT’s website if there are any questions about the translated content.

    DoIT uses Google Translate to provide language translations of its content. Google Translate is a free, automated service that relies on data and technology to provide its translations. The Google Translate feature is provided for informational purposes only. Translations cannot be guaranteed as exact or without the inclusion of incorrect or inappropriate language. Google Translate is a third-party service and site users will be leaving DoIT to utilize translated content. As such, DoIT does not guarantee and does not accept responsibility for, the accuracy, reliability, or performance of this service nor the limitations provided by this service, such as the inability to translate specific files like PDFs and graphics (e.g. .jpgs, .gifs, etc.).

    DoIT provides Google Translate as an online tool for its users, but DoIT does not directly endorse the website or imply that it is the only solution available to users. All site visitors may choose to use alternate tools for their translation needs. Any individuals or parties that use DoIT content in translated form, whether by Google Translate or by any other translation services, do so at their own risk. DoIT is not liable for any loss or damages arising out of, or issues related to, the use of or reliance on translated content. DoIT assumes no liability for any site visitor’s activities in connection with use of the Google Translate functionality or content.

    The Google Translate service is a means by which DoIT offers translations of content and is meant solely for the convenience of non-English speaking users of the website. The translated content is provided directly and dynamically by Google; DoIT has no direct control over the translated content as it appears using this tool. Therefore, in all contexts, the English content, as directly provided by DoIT is to be held authoritative.

    Carbon Monoxide

    Carbon monoxide (abbreviated CO) is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced by any burning source (such as furnaces, stoves, ovens, kerosene or gasoline heaters or generators, automobiles, or any other combustion source). CO can cause dizziness, headaches, nausea, unconsciousness, or death. It blocks oxygen by combining with hemoglobin in red blood cells, and can cause death even at very low levels.

    From 1999-2004 Maryland had a total of 46 deaths due to accidental CO exposure, for a rate of 1.43 deaths per million persons per year, compared with a national rate of 1.53 deaths per million per year. By comparison, some states had a rate as low as 0.35 deaths per million per year for the same period.

    What can you do to protect yourself from Carbon Monoxide?

    • Have your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.
    • Install a battery-operated CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. If the detector sounds leave your home immediately and call 911.
    • Get medical help if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed, or nauseous.
    • Don't use a generator, charcoal grill, camp stove, or other gasoline or charcoal-burning device inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window.
    • Don't run a car or truck inside a garage attached to your house, even if you leave the door open.
    • Make sure that stoves and fireplaces are properly vented. Don't heat your house with a gas oven.​