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    Cancer Survivorship
    The term “cancer survivor” refers to someone living with, through, or beyond cancer from the moment of diagnosis through the rest of life. This includes patients who are being treated for cancer, who are free of cancer, and who live with cancer as a chronic disease, undergoing continued treatment and surveillance. The term “co-survivor” refers to friends, family members, and caregivers who share in the experience of caring for a person with cancer.1
     
    In 2016, there were an estimated 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase to 20.3 million by 2026.2
     
    Survivor Resources
    Guide to Cancer Survivorship Care and Resources for Cancer Patients
    In 2014, the Maryland Cancer Collaborative developed a Guide to Cancer Surviv5211CancerCollabFINAL.jpgorship Care and Resources for Cancer Patients. The guide outlines many issues that may impact a patient throughout the cancer survivorship journey.  It is divided into three phases of survivorship: Treatment Planning, Active Treatment, and Post Treatment.  Each phase of survivorship also links to a comprehensive list of resource to assist with various needs.
     
    Guide to Cancer Survivorship
     
    (click to view resources)
    Phase 2:
    (click to view resources)
    (click to view resources)
      Physical Needs
    ·         Routine cancer screening
    ·        Diagnostic testing and       planning for treatment
    ·         Primary care for overall health
    ·        Genetic testing and counseling (as indicated)
    ·         Dental care​
    ·         Fertility preservation
    ·         Clinical trials
    ·         Body image
    ·        Ability to live/function independently
      Medical Decision-Making
    ·         Advance directives
    ·        Hospice care (as indicated)
    ·         Palliative care
    ·         Second opinions
    ●  Psychosocial Needs
    ·         Psychological
    ·         Spiritual
    ·         Family support
    ·         Intimacy
    ·         Financial
      Wellness and Lifestyle Behaviors
    ·        Alcohol/drug rehabilitation (rehab)
    ·         Stopping tobacco use
    ·         Exercise/physical activity
    ·         Nutrition
    ·        Stress reduction and relaxation
      Complementary and Integrative Medicine
      Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy
      Physical Needs
    ·         Treatment side effects
    ·         Recommended cancer screening
    ·         Primary care for overall health
    ·         Genetic testing and counseling (as indicated)
    ·         Dental care
    ·         Fertility preservation
    ·         Clinical trials
    ·         Body image
    ·         Ability to live/function independently
      Medical Decision-Making
    ·         Advance directives
    ·        Hospice care (as indicated)
    ·         Palliative care
    ·         Second opinions
      Psychosocial Needs
    ·         Psychological
    ·         Spiritual
    ·         Family support
    ·         Intimacy
    ·         Financial
      Wellness and Lifestyle Behaviors
    ·       Alcohol/drug rehabilitation (rehab)
    ·         Stopping tobacco use
    ·        Exercise/physical activity
    ·         Nutrition
    ·         Stress reduction and relaxation
      Complementary and Integrative Medicine
      Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy
     
      Survivorship Care Plan and Treatment Summary
      Physical Needs
    ·        Long-term treatment ​side effects
    ·        Routine cancer screening
    ·         Primary care for overall health
    ·        Genetic testing and counseling (as indicated)
    ·         Dental care
    ·         Infertility treatment
    ·        Clinical trials for long-term effects
    ·         Body image
    ·        Ability to live/function independently
      Medical Decision-Making
    ·         Advance directives
    ·        Hospice care (as indicated) and loss
    ·         Palliative care
    ·         Second opinions
      Psychosocial Needs
    ·         Psychological
    ·         Spiritual
    ·         Family support
    ·         Intimacy
    ·         Financial
      Wellness and Lifestyle Behaviors
    ·        Alcohol/drug rehabilitation (rehab)
    ·         Stopping tobacco use
    ·        Exercise/physical activity
    ·         Nutrition
    ·        Stress reduction and relaxation
      Complementary and Integrative Medicine
      Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy
     
    Bring American Cancer Society - Survivorship: During and After
    Click here to find information and tips on staying active and healthy during and after cancer treatment. You can also get information on dealing with the possibility of cancer recurrence, and find inspiration and hope in stories about other people whose lives have been touched by cancer. 
           acs.png
     
    Bring DC Cancer Survivor Stories3
     
    Bring Your Brave
    (breast cancer in young women)
     
    “Being proactive in your health is definitely the most important thing,” says Charity, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 27. She shares her story in a video.
     
     
     woman cancer sur.png

    Screen For Life
    (colorectal cancer)
     
    “Fortunately, because the cancer was found early enough, the surgery was successful. But I never would have found it early if I hadn’t been screened,” says colorectal cancer survivor Robert.
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    Inside Knowledge
    (gynecologic cancer)
     
    “Be brave. Ask questions,” says uterine and ovarian cancer survivor Jenny Allen. She tells a moving personal story about noticing symptoms, being diagnosed, and getting treatment in this video.
     
     woman2survivor.jpg